Scheiwiller Josef

1946

After Josef Scheiwiller had completed his training as a coachbuilder in 1928, he opened a car repair shop in Zurich. The name Scheiwiller quickly became a reliable address for special requests. Among other things, the plumber earned his good reputation through his box bodies. The cars at that time did not yet have a trunk, so that for the transport of luggage and similar items a metal box attached to the rear was necessary. Scheiwiller’s constructions harmoniously adapted to the respective vehicle shape and did not interfere with its appearance.
One of the first Scheiwiller bodies was a Packard estate car. At the request of the University Hospital Zurich, the plumber converted it into an ambulance van with the aid of a rear extension. The core business, however, remained the repair of vehicles, although Scheiwiller’s passion was bodywork construction. Before the Second World War, the plumber constructed a sports car with eight side vents and therefore called the saxophone. The spectacular vehicle was built on the chassis of an Alfa Romeo Type 8, Scheiwiller’s racing car for Alfa Romeo, built around 1946.
It was not possible to find out what happened between 1946 and 1985 before Scheiwiller’s son Ren√© took over the management of the company. One thing is certain: Scheiwiller’s death marked the end of the company’s history of car body construction. The workshop specialized in the repair of accidental damage including paint work. Meanwhile, the tinsmith’s shop has become a joint stock company, which now runs the family in the third generation.

Related vehicles